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What to Expect

Learn about current dynamics, innovative approaches and promising partnerships for sustainable water use benefits and shared solutions from around the world

Space for dialogue and sharing of your own experiences and expertise

Platform for networking with dedicated people, reflecting mountain development priorities in view of global change

Help build strategic alliances and partnerships for a mountain specific climate and development agenda

Key Objectives

Gain a better understanding of the current state and dynamics of mountain related environmental goods and services under the impacts of a changing climate

Explore how climate change is affecting environmental services provision and its impact on competing demands between upstream-downstream actors as well as between various sectors

Collect and share experiences and best practices from around the world on successful partnerships and supportive alliances for advancing the sustainable use and equitable benefits for mountain communities

Full Objectives of Thematic Track 1

Acting as global water towers, mountains provide water for drinking, irrigation and hydropower to populations around the world - a service which cannot be overstated. In the three connected sessions of this thematic track, the goal is to gain a better understanding of the current state and dynamics of water related goods and services and how their provision might be affected by a changing climate in mountain areas. We also seek to explore how the changing delivery patterns may impact and shape conflicting demands (upstream-downstream, between sectors), and finally we intend to learn from contributions how these issues can be harmonized and which mechanisms are required to sustainably and collaboratively manage the resource.

T - 1.1    Current trends and dynamics

In this session, we seek inputs and contributions that help gain a better understanding of the current state and dynamics of mountain related environmental goods and services, especially related to water and energy, and how their provision is affected by climate change in mountain areas.

T - 2.1    Pathways towards a sustainable mountain future

We also want to explore how the changing climate is affecting environmental service provision and its impact on competing demands between upstream-downstream actors as well as between sectors e.g. hydropower production, irrigation agriculture, domestic use. Furthermore, we wish to learn how these issues can be addressed at relevant spheres (policy, economy) and scales (local, national, regional).

T - 3.1    Enabling partnerships

We seek inputs for discussing potential collaborative mechanisms, innovative partnerships and alliances conducive to reconciling demands and claims. This session will foster a perspective on cooperation, focusing, particularly, on mountain communities’ interests as stewards of mountain environments.

Guiding Questions

How is climate change affecting water flow and availability, both seasonally and generally in mountain areas - and how does this impact water related environmental service delivery up- and downstream?

To what extent can environment-based adaptation solutions mitigate the effects of climate change impacts in mountain areas?

Which ‘good practices’ and solutions exist for harmonizing conflicting claims and demands? What enabling environment and regulatory framework might be required to transfer learnings across mountain regions?

How can large scale infrastructure development projects (such as the Chinese ‘Belt and Road Initiative’) anticipate the effects of climate change in mountain areas and integrate adaptation needs, and how can such initiatives be leveraged to improve upstream-downstream relationships?

Which are the fundamental principles of successful examples of inclusive and cross-sectoral partnerships for climate change adaptation? How can enabling factors of successful partnerships be transferred to other contexts?

Which partnerships can help to realize the potential of hydro power in mountain areas without compromising the livelihoods and interests of local communities under a changing climate? What are potential trade-offs and how can they be mitigated or reconciled?

Contribution and Submission Process

Short abstracts (350-400 words) are invited to address one of the four core themes for the review by the scientific steering committee. Selected authors  will be asked to present their contributions at the WMF 2018 in a poster format followed by a 7 minute ‘flash-talk’. Inputs are sought to discuss potential collaborative mechanisms, innovative partnerships and alliances conducive to reconciling demands and claims. Please refer to content and suggested guiding questions to shape your proposed contribution accordingly.

All proposals should be submitted using the forum's website. Deadline for contribution proposals is Sunday 29 July 2018, 11:59 (GMT +6).

When and Where

Please refer to the conference programme.

Track coordinators: Nadine Salzmann (University of Fribourg), Christian Huggel (Univesity of Zürich) and Philippus Wester (ICIMOD)